Kenneth Abdo


Ken Abdo is a Vice President of the Lommen Abdo Law Firm and Chair of the Entertainment Department. In over more than 25 years of practice, he has helped build one of the largest, most visible and successful entertainment law practices in the Midwest. Ken's practice is limited to entertainment law and his primary focus is on music law transactions. He is a known artist advocate and leader within the national entertainment law community. He is a popular author and lecturer.

The firm's clients have included multiple Grammy® award recipients, gold and platinum recording artists as well as Oscar, Emmy, Peabody and Spirit award winners. Ken is a voting member of The Recording Academy, a current member of the Recording Academy Chicago Chapter Board of Governors, the past National Chair of The Grammy® Foundation Entertainment Law Initiative, the past National Chair of the American Bar Association's Forum on the Entertainment and Sports Industries and is a contributing author to the law school textbook, "Law & Business of the Entertainment Industries" (Biederman, et al.).

He has been on the Minnesota Super Lawyers list in Entertainment Law each year since 2003 and is one of The Best Lawyers in America by U.S. World & News Report for his work in Entertainment Law-Music. He was selected as a “Minnesota Attorney of the Year” in 2009 byMinnesota Lawyer. He was honored as an Alumni of Notable Achievement by the University of Minnesota College of Liberal Arts. He is rated AV® Preeminent™ 5.0 out of 5 in entertainment and intellectual property by Martindale-Hubbell.

For more information than you need to know on Ken Abdo, read the article published in the newsletter of the William Mitchell College of Law or read the article on Ken Abdo which was published in the American Bar Association’s Forum in the Entertainment and Sports Industries quarterly publication.  Ken was interviewed for an article on the MinnPost.com news blog on the Performance Right Act. Read the article: "As stations bombard us with ads against the 'radio tax,' here's the other side of the story."